New DI-1000 Digital Load Cell Interface from Loadstar Sensors

September 9, 2008

Easy to use DI-1000 converts any conventional load cell into a digital USB load cell

DI-1000

Fremont, California - Loadstar Sensors Inc. today announced the availability of its DI-1000 Digital Load Cell Interface, designed to work seamlessly with conventional resistive load cells. The DI-1000 provides a simple, convenient method to convert the millivolt output from a load cell into a PC friendly digital USB output. Just plug in your load cell into one end of the DI-1000 and plug the other end to a PC and you get a PC ready load cell.

The DI-1000 provides many key features in order to simplify the process of building a PC friendly load measurement system:

  • Compatible with any PC running Windows XP or Vista
  • Calibrated output in simple ASCII format
  • View loads on demand or in streaming mode
  • Command set for software integration
  • Optional wireless: Bluetooth or IEEE 802.15.4
  • Optional LoadVUE software allows user to log and plot data

SBeam Diagram

"The new DI-1000 streamlines the tedious process of getting data from a load cell to a PC," says Div Harish, Co-Founder & CEO of Loadstar Sensors, Inc. "Users benefit from our Plug and Sense™ technology & can build their applications faster & more cost effectively. For users who need to log and chart data we offer LoadVUE application software that gives users an easy to use interface from a PC."

For more information about the DI-1000, please visit www.loadstarsensors.com or call 510-623-9600.

About Loadstar Sensors, Inc.

Established in 2004, Loadstar Sensors, Inc. is a leader in the design and manufacture of capacitive sensors for automotive, aerospace, medical device, industrial and consumer applications. We currently sell capacitive load (force/weight) sensors that offer high sensitivities in an easy to use, mechanically robust, low profile package. We partner with leading OEMs to incorporate load sensors into mass market products where existing load measurement solutions were neither reliable nor economically feasible.